Health benefits

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health-benfits

Health Benefits

Mushrooms for vitamin D and healthy bones

  • Mushrooms exposed to sunlight (or the UV light in sunlight) naturally generate vitamin D, which enhances calcium absorption and bone strength.
  • Farmers can give mushrooms 1-2 seconds of UV light after harvesting, generating you daily needs of vitamin D.
  • Vitamin D deficiency is common in Australia, especially during winter and in the southern regions.
  • Light-exposed mushrooms are a tasty and nutritious way to get your daily vitamin D needs.

Mushrooms on Cancer

  • Mushrooms contain compounds that have been linked to lowering the risk of a range of cancers.
  • Compounds such as lectins and other unique proteins, glucans and other special carbohydrates, all have the potential to inhibit cancer formation and growth.
  • Three population studies show that women who eat an average of one button mushroom a day have half the risk of breast cancer than women who do not eat mushrooms.
  • A meta-analysis of the link between mushroom eating and breast cancer confirms that there is a definite link, with mushroom consumption reducing the risk of the cancer.
  • There is ongoing research to determine if fresh mushrooms and mushroom extracts can help to lower the risk of cancer, especially breast and prostate cancer.

Mushrooms, Diabetes & the Glycaemic Index (GI)

  • Are a nutrient-rich food for people with diabetes.
  • Do not raise blood glucose levels, that is, they have a very low GI.
  • Help keep your blood glucose levels normal.
  • Help keep your blood pressure normal by providing potassium and virtually no sodium (salt).
  • Are perfect for weight control as they are low in kilojoules and help appetite control and the avoidance of over-eating.

Great taste & healthy blood pressure with mushrooms

  • Mushrooms have a deliciously rich savoury flavour called ‘umami’.
  • Much of the umami flavour comes from the natural glutamates in mushrooms.
  • The umami flavour of mushrooms can replace some of the salt used in recipes.
  • Consuming less salt and fewer salty foods helps to keep blood pressure levels normal.

Unique proteins, negligible fats, low carbs – a healthy combination

  • Mushrooms have a deliciously rich savoury flavour called ‘umami’.
  • Much of the umami flavour comes from the natural glutamates in mushrooms.
  • The umami flavour of mushrooms can replace some of the salt used in recipes.
  • Consuming less salt and fewer salty foods helps to keep blood pressure levels normal.

Nutrients per 100g serve:

nutrients-img
g = grams; mg = milligrams
Source: Nutrient Reference Values for Australia & New Zealand 2006; NUTTAB 2010

Mushrooms deliver essential vitamins and minerals

Mushrooms are an exceptionally nutrient-dense food, with one serve offering a surprising amount and array of essential nutrients. One serve of mushrooms (100g – three button mushrooms) has:
  • One-third of your daily needs of the vitamins riboflavin and biotin.
  • One-quarter of your daily needs of the vitamins niacin and pantothenic acid.
  • All your daily needs of vitamin D in light-exposed mushrooms.
  • A modest amount of folate and vitamin B12.
  • A quarter or more of your daily needs of the essential minerals selenium, chromium and copper.
  • About 10% of your needs of potassium and phosphorus.
Abundant antioxidants (covered in the section on immunity).
Vitamins and minerals per 100g serve
mineral-img
% RDI = Percentage of the Recommended Dietary Intake each day
% AI = Percentage of the Adequate Intake each day (used when an RDI has not been established)
mg = milligrams; mcg = micrograms
Source: Nutrient Reference Values for Australia & New Zealand 2006; NUTTAB 2010

Mushrooms reduce the risk of gout

There is no evidence that certain fruits, vegetables or mushrooms cause gout or make it worse.
In fact, a high consumption of fruit, vegetables and mushrooms is linked to a lower risk of gout.
A wholesome diet, such as the traditional Mediterranean diet, is associated with a lower risk of gout.
Advice to gout sufferers to avoid foods such as spinach, asparagus and mushrooms is not justified.

Mushrooms keep your heart healthy

  • Mushrooms have a type of fibre that is naturally helping to lower blood cholesterol in a similar manner to statin medication.
  • Mushrooms are low in fat, sodium and kilojoules, helping to control weight and blood pressure.
  • Mushrooms, along with vegetables, help to reduce the risk of heart disease.